• March 9 2012

    great perspective!

theatlantic:

The Soft Bigotry of ‘Kony 2012’

The much-circulated campaign subtly reinforces an idea that has been one of Africa’s biggest disasters: that well-meaning Westerners need to come in and fix it. Africans, in this telling, are helpless victims, and Westerners are the heroes. It’s part of a long tradition of Western advocacy that has, for centuries, adopted some form of white man’s burden, treating African people as cared for only to the extent that Westerners care, their problems solvable only to the extent that Westerners solve them, and surely damned unless we can save them. First it was with missionaries, then “civilizing” missions, and finally the ultimate end of white paternalism, which was placing Africans under the direct Western control of imperialism. And while imperialism may have collapsed 50 years ago, that mentality persists, because it is rewarding and ennobling to feel needed and to believe you are doing something good.
“African solutions for African problems” isn’t just a State Department slogan, and it isn’t about promoting African leadership, although that’s certainly important. Africans are already leaders. There are many reasons for Africa’s amazing rise over the last ten years, but one of the biggest has been African leadership. It’s not a coincidence that the 200 years of Western leadership in Africa were some of the continent’s worst. Africans have proven time and again that they’re better at fixing African problems. While helping is always good, and it’s great that people care, what Kony 2012 ignores is that Africans are not “invisible” and the last thing they need is for a bunch of Westerners to parachute in and take over (again). We sometimes mistake our position at the top of the global food chain as evidence that we’re more capable, that our power will extend into complicated and far-away societies, that we’ll be better at fixing their problems than they are. This assumption, both well-meaning and self-glorifying, has led us into disaster after disaster after disaster.
Read more. [Image: Invisible Children]

    great perspective!

    theatlantic:

    The Soft Bigotry of ‘Kony 2012’

    The much-circulated campaign subtly reinforces an idea that has been one of Africa’s biggest disasters: that well-meaning Westerners need to come in and fix it. Africans, in this telling, are helpless victims, and Westerners are the heroes. It’s part of a long tradition of Western advocacy that has, for centuries, adopted some form of white man’s burden, treating African people as cared for only to the extent that Westerners care, their problems solvable only to the extent that Westerners solve them, and surely damned unless we can save them. First it was with missionaries, then “civilizing” missions, and finally the ultimate end of white paternalism, which was placing Africans under the direct Western control of imperialism. And while imperialism may have collapsed 50 years ago, that mentality persists, because it is rewarding and ennobling to feel needed and to believe you are doing something good.

    African solutions for African problems” isn’t just a State Department slogan, and it isn’t about promoting African leadership, although that’s certainly important. Africans are already leaders. There are many reasons for Africa’s amazing rise over the last ten years, but one of the biggest has been African leadership. It’s not a coincidence that the 200 years of Western leadership in Africa were some of the continent’s worst. Africans have proven time and again that they’re better at fixing African problems. While helping is always good, and it’s great that people care, what Kony 2012 ignores is that Africans are not “invisible” and the last thing they need is for a bunch of Westerners to parachute in and take over (again). We sometimes mistake our position at the top of the global food chain as evidence that we’re more capable, that our power will extend into complicated and far-away societies, that we’ll be better at fixing their problems than they are. This assumption, both well-meaning and self-glorifying, has led us into disaster after disaster after disaster.

    Read more. [Image: Invisible Children]

    Mar 9, 2012 @ 2:34 pm

  • Martin says this is how I chew.
allcreatures:

Photo: Sakchai Lalit / Associated Press (via SFGate: Day in Pictures)

    Martin says this is how I chew.

    allcreatures:

    Photo: Sakchai Lalit / Associated Press (via SFGate: Day in Pictures)

    2012-02- 23T14:36:25Z Feb 23, 2012 @ 2:36 pm

  • Would love to have more journalists like this. 
shortformblog:

capitalnewyork:

“We go to remote war zones to report what is happening. The public have a    right to know what our government, and our armed forces, are doing in our    name. Our mission is to speak the truth to power. We send home that first    rough draft of history. We can and do make a difference in exposing the    horrors of war and especially the atrocities that befall civilians.” - Marie Colvin

You get the real impression that Colvin’s influence in death could go far beyond her influence in life. There’s probably a 18-year-old journalism student who’s reading this quote somewhere, saying to themselves, “I can do this.”

    Would love to have more journalists like this. 

    shortformblog:

    capitalnewyork:

    “We go to remote war zones to report what is happening. The public have a right to know what our government, and our armed forces, are doing in our name. Our mission is to speak the truth to power. We send home that first rough draft of history. We can and do make a difference in exposing the horrors of war and especially the atrocities that befall civilians.” - Marie Colvin

    You get the real impression that Colvin’s influence in death could go far beyond her influence in life. There’s probably a 18-year-old journalism student who’s reading this quote somewhere, saying to themselves, “I can do this.”

    2012-02- 23T12:05:31Z Feb 23, 2012 @ 12:05 pm

  • Beautiful, would love to live here. Preferably in Zimbabwe.
theblackworkshop:

Glass Loggia House

    Beautiful, would love to live here. Preferably in Zimbabwe.

    theblackworkshop:

    Glass Loggia House

    2012-02- 23T11:17:34Z Feb 23, 2012 @ 11:17 am

  • February 21 2012

    Its me! (seal/ceal/nicknamesfromchildhood)
allcreatures:

Harp seal pup (Phoca groenlandicus) St Lawrence Gulf, Canada.
Picture: DOUG ALLAN/NPL/REX (via Freeze Frame: Doug Allan’s images of wildlife in some of the world’s coldest places - Telegraph)

    Its me! (seal/ceal/nicknamesfromchildhood)

    allcreatures:

    Harp seal pup (Phoca groenlandicus) St Lawrence Gulf, Canada.

    Picture: DOUG ALLAN/NPL/REX (via Freeze Frame: Doug Allan’s images of wildlife in some of the world’s coldest places - Telegraph)

    Feb 21, 2012 @ 12:01 pm

  • For Marty and I’s Zambezi side home in t-minus 20 years…
creatingaquietmind:

(via 1kindesign)

    For Marty and I’s Zambezi side home in t-minus 20 years…

    creatingaquietmind:

    (via 1kindesign)

    2012-02- 21T11:50:54Z Feb 21, 2012 @ 11:50 am

  • Ready or not, here i come!

allcreatures:

Picture: Nenad Druzic/Solent News & Photo Agency

    Ready or not, here i come!

    allcreatures:

    Picture: Nenad Druzic/Solent News & Photo Agency

    2012-02- 21T11:37:01Z Feb 21, 2012 @ 11:37 am

  • I can only hope Ron Paul’s stance on military invention continues to gain support

    http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/politics/2012/02/veterans-for-ron-paul-rally-at-white-house/

    2012-02- 21T11:32:55Z Feb 21, 2012 @ 11:32 am